RSS

Category Archives: PowerPoint

How do I count the words in a PowerPoint 2013 presentation?

Some time ago, I published what has turned into a pretty popular post on how to count the words in your PowerPoint 2007 document. This is something that is a little tricky to find, so perfect for one of these how-to posts.

All was well and good, then I had some editing to do on a PowerPoint document and my PC automatically opened it in PowerPoint 2013. Where on earth did I find out how to count the words now? Here’s how …

Why would I want to count the words in a presentation?

You might have a word limit imposed by a course tutor, or, more likely, you’re an editor with a per-word rate who needs to check how many words you’ve actually edited.

How do I count the number of words in a PowerPoint 2013 presentation?

To do this, with your document open, you need to go into the FILE tab at the extreme left of the tab list … (one day I’ll work out how to get those tab titles out of capitals and let you know!)

menu

Once in the File tab, stay in the Info area where you land, and click on the arrow next to Properties in the right hand column. Once clicked, you will have a choice between Show Document Panel and Advanced Properties. Click on Advanced Properties:

1 properties

This is, dare I say it, a little easier than in PowerPoint 2007. Once you’ve clicked on Advanced Properties, you’re given a list of properties. Click on the Statistics tab at the top and you’ll find your Word Count, among other information.

2 properties

To return to your document, click OK and then back to the Home tab in your document.

How do I count the number of words in a PowerPoint 2010 presentation?

Please see the post on PowerPoint 2010.

Related posts:

How do I count the number of words in a PowerPoint 2007 presentation? (this is a little different).

How do I count the number of words in a PowerPoint 2010 presentation? (different again!)

If you’ve enjoyed this post or found it useful, please do comment, or share using the buttons below! Thank you!

Please note, these hints work with versions of Microsoft Office currently in use – Office 2007, Office 2010 and Office 2013, all for PC. Mac compatible versions of Word should have similar options. Always save a copy of your document before manipulating it. I bear no responsibility for any pickles you might get yourself into!

Find all the short cuts here

 
2 Comments

Posted by on December 4, 2013 in Errors, New skills, PowerPoint, Short cuts, Writing

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

How do I count the words in a PowerPoint 2010 presentation?

Some time ago, I published what has turned into a pretty popular post on how to count the words in your PowerPoint 2007 document. This is something that is a little tricky to find, so perfect for one of these how-to posts.

How do I count the words in a PowerPoint 2010 presentation?

It’s all a bit different in a PowerPoint 2010 document if you’re used to PowerPoint 2007, because they’ve got rid of the Office button and replaced it with a File tab.

So: open the document and click on the File tab to the left of the Home tab.

This will bring you up a screen where you can open previous documents, save as, etc. Click on Info on the left and your properties will come up on the extreme right.

But of course, yet again, the thing you want to see isn’t immediately visible. Go right to the bottom of the screen and click Show All Properties.

And there’s your word count.

Related posts:

How do I count the number of words in a PowerPoint 2007 presentation? (this is a little different).

How do I count the number of words in a PowerPoint 2013 presentation? (different again!)

If you’ve enjoyed this post or found it useful, please do comment, or share using the buttons below! Thank you!

Please note, these hints work with versions of Microsoft Office currently in use – Office 2007, Office 2010 and Office 2013, all for PC. Mac compatible versions of Word should have similar options. Always save a copy of your document before manipulating it. I bear no responsibility for any pickles you might get yourself into!

Find all the short cuts here

 
2 Comments

Posted by on December 4, 2013 in Errors, New skills, PowerPoint, Short cuts, Writing

 

Tags: , , , , ,

Scheduling blog posts, scheduling writing, and keeping going

Things to doAs part of my series on blogging, in this article I’m going to talk about how frequently to blog, keeping going, and how to get down to writing those posts. This is primarily aimed at people who are blogging for their business, but this advice applies to anyone who wants to build the audience for their blog and needs help getting down to writing posts and sticking to blogging.

So that’s everyone, right?

How often should I blog?

How often should you publish a blog post? Well, that’s up to you to a certain extent. But if you’re looking to appear high up in the search engine results and keep your readers happy, you should keep it regular.

Most advice that I’ve read suggests posting at least twice a week. This will keep your readers engaged, keep your content updated enough for the search engines to promote it up their lists, and get enough keywords and content out there to keep your statistics nice and busy.

Varying your blog posts

Even a book review blog could do with a bit of livening up every now and again. A good example is my friend Ali – she mainly posts long-format book reviews, but she also takes up general topics or talks about book-buying trips – which varies things for her readers and gives them something new every now and again.

I choose to vary things and give myself a structure by running series in different topics every week. I tend to publish a short Troublesome Pairs post about a pair of easily confused words or at present an article on blogging on a Monday, a Word tip or business post on a Wednesday, and I always run a Saturday Business Chat or Chat Update each Saturday. I don’t stick to this slavishly – this post is coming out on a Tuesday to avoid the bank holiday, but it helps me to structure things and means that there’s something for everyone every week (I hope).

You don’t have to just publish text pieces, either. I’m sticking to text for the moment, but you can include video and audio pieces as well.

This article by Joanna Penn of The Creative Penn has really good advice about when she schedules her text, audio and video content. Her blog is really popular, with loads of comments and great search engine optimisation, and if you’re planning on using different media, this would be a good plan to follow.

Including guest posts on your blog

I’ve talked about this a bit already in my article on Reciprocity in Social Media, but hosting guest posts (and having them on other people’s blogs, too) is a great way to spark up interest in your readers and get reciprocal links and readers. I’m going to write more about the etiquette of guest blogging soon. But again, it varies things a bit. I wouldn’t personally have a guest post more than once every couple of weeks.

How do I remember my ideas for blog posts?

If you’re anything like me, you’ll have ideas and inspirations for blog posts at the oddest moments. If I’m anywhere near my desk and PC, I pop into my WordPress platform and create a Draft blog post, sometimes with just a title, sometimes with a few jotted notes. If I’m learning something new (like turning footnotes into endnotes, just today), I’ll take screenshots as I go along, and save them ready to insert into a post on the subject. If I spot a picture I want to take or have a document with a feature I want to use, I take a photo and email it to myself or save the document in the relative folder.

If I’m out and about, I use the note app on my phone to make a quite note of what I want to write about, or, if I’m feeling brave, I go into the WordPress app and create a draft from there!

How do I organise my images for my blog posts?

Because many of my blog posts are very screen shot based, and I always include some kind of image in my posts (looks good when sharing, attracts readers, etc.), I have a folder in my Windows Explorer called Blog posts. This has sub-folders for all of the blog posts I write, or plan on writing, so I can pop screen prints and pics into the appropriate folder and know they’ll be there for later. I have a set of generic pictures in the Blog posts folder, too, that I can use as images at the top of posts. I prefer to use my own images to avoid copyright issues.

How do I get down to writing my blog?

Here’s my secret: blogging SESSIONS.

You do not have to write your blog posts on the day you publish them! You can write them in advance, save them up, and publish in advance!

I’ve always got some draft posts on the go – either because I’ve had ideas (see above) and not yet written them up, or I’m part way through a series and I’ve planned the whole thing out. So when I can see at least a 90 minute slot in my schedule, I’ll schedule in time to write blog posts.

I’ll then bash through as many as I can, using my draft posts for inspiration and possibly already having pictures ready to go, either saved or inserted into the posts. Then I just need to write the text. In a good session I can get at least a week’s worth of posts ready in one go.

I’m used to having to write because that’s some of what I do in my job. If you have to wait for inspiration to strike before you write posts … just make sure that inspiration has plenty of room to keep going! Anyway, it’s surprising what you can produce when you sit down and tell yourself that you have 90 minutes to generate a load of blog posts!

Scheduling publication of blog posts

schedulingI would imagine that all blogging platforms have a scheduling feature. Here in WordPress, I can edit the Publish Immediately field to the right of my writing pane, and choose a date and time to publish the post (I also automatically post a link to Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. This means I can schedule a post to publish when I’m going to be away from my desk and the post will still be publicised).

If you don’t know how to schedule blog posts on the platform you’re using, Google your platform name plus something like “schedule blog posts” and you should be able to find instructions.

So, when I do a big writing session, I write the posts I want to write, then schedule them all in for the appropriate days. I can view just the posts I’ve scheduled to make sure there aren’t any clashes, then I can get on with work or even go on holiday, knowing that my blog will be publishing when I’m away.

How do I make myself keep on blogging?

If you get stuck and don’t post for a while, or don’t feel like posting, don’t panic! Here are some things you can consider doing:

  • Have a think about why you’re blogging and whether you do actually want to continue (try reading my article on 10 reasons not to blog or the one on 10 reasons to write a blog!)
  • Have a little brainstorm and think of some ideas for blog posts – just jot them down and write them up later
  • Get into a writing routine that suits you – whether that’s posting once a day or having a weekly blogging afternoon
  • Sign up for one of the various schemes that suggests something to post, or ask your friends or readers to make suggestions about what to write about
  • Consider creating some themes – it’s easier to come up with an idea for a Word tips post than an idea for “a post”
  • Don’t beat yourself up. Look at other people’s posts for inspiration. Ask for some guest bloggers. Review something you use in your work life. Write about something personal

————–

This article has talked about how often to blog, how to organise your blogging, how to schedule posts and what to do if you get stuck. I’d love to hear your thoughts on these topics – do post a comment, and if you’ve enjoyed this post, please share it using the buttons below.

Related posts:

10 reasons to start a blog – why you should do it now!

10 reasons NOT to write a blog – and why you should stop and think, at least!

Reciprocity and Social Media – how to negotiate social media kindly and politely

Top 10 blogging sins – avoid these if you can!

 
 

Tags: , , , , ,

How to search for almost anything in Microsoft Office, other software and web pages

Today we’re going to learn about the wonders of Ctrl-F and how it can help you to search for text almost anywhere.

We’re going to look at an overview of the basics in this article, then I’ll go into more detail on advanced searching and replacing in another one.

What does Ctrl-F mean?

Ctrl-F is shorthand for “press the control key and the F key at the same time“. It’s the way in which key combinations are expressed. You will have one or two Ctrl keys on your keyboard (I have two) and it’s usually easiest to press Ctrl, hold it down, then press F.

keyboard

If you’re looking at a  Word, Excel or Powerpoint document, a web page or, in fact, many other things, you will now be able to search for text in that document, on that page, etc. Let’s go through the different places you can use this.

Searching in Word 2007 using Ctrl-F

Word is one of the places where searching is most useful. It also offers the largest range of options for searching, and we’re just going to look at the most common today but watch this space for an article on advanced searching.

I use Ctrl-F to …

  • Search for a place in a text by a word in its heading
  • Search for tables / figures and references to them in a document to make sure they match up
  • Search for chapter headings in a book / thesis when I want to check they have a consistent style
  • Search for a name to check how it was spelled last time

and many other things.

When you have a Word document open, to bring up the search dialogue box, press the Control key and the F key at the same time. You’ll then be presented with the basic search box:

Word 1

It will usually appear to the side of the document, so as not to obscure the text. Enter the text you wish to search for, in this case Richard Branson, and press the Find next button (or the Enter key). Word will highlight the text you’re looking for.

That’s great, but what if you want more accurate searching? Press the More >> button for more options:

Word 2

Here, you have options to match the case, find whole words only, etc. For the moment, we’re going to concentrate on just these two (see the article on advanced searching for the other options).

If you choose Match case, it will search for only those words in the exact same case as the one in the search box. If you choose Find whole words only, it will look for only that text, not that text included in a longer word. We’ll have a look at how that works in just a moment.

Moving along the options, we have a Reading Highlight button. This will highlight all of the instances of your search word in your document. I find this useful if I’m writing a text to use for Search Engine Optimisation purposes and want to see how many times I’ve included a particular phrase:

Word 3

Note: if you change your search term, you will need to Clear Highlighting before highlighting again, otherwise all of the original highlighting is shown.

The next option is Find In. This is useful if you only want to search a particular part of the text for your word. Highlight the section in which you want to search, and then choose Current Selection (or, if you’ve got a section highlighted for some other reason, choose Main Document.

Word 4

Let’s have a look at some of these options in practice, using a rather odd paragraph I made up for illustration purposes:

Word 5

Here, I’ve just searched for char, not worrying about any additional options. You can see that it’s found char, but also character, charlady and Char, because I didn’t specify that I wanted only the word form “char”.

If I want to only find “char” in the text, I need to tell Word to Match case and Find whole words only. Then I will get the desired result:

Word 6

Searching in Word 2010 using Ctrl-F

Of course, they went and changed this to make it more useful and user-friendly in Word 2010 … I was a bit flummoxed when I first tried to use it, but you can get back to the dialogue box we’ve looked at above, and there are some additional useful features.

In Word 2010, if you press Ctrl-F, you’ll be given a Navigation pane to the left-hand side of the document:

Word 7

Put your search term in the box and it will automatically highlight all of the instances of that word in the document, give you the number of times it appears, and list all the instances so you can click and visit each of them:

Word 8

This is handy, and although you can do more things here to do with looking at the whole document, you can’t immediately refine your search to whole words only, match case, etc. But you can get to that familiar dialogue box.

Click the down arrow next to the search box and you’ll be presented with a list of options. We’ll look at the advanced ones next time.

Word 9

For now, select Advanced Find, and a familiar dialogue box will pop up …

Word 10

Searching in Excel using Ctrl-F

All of the other software in Microsoft Office uses Ctrl-F, however to a more limited and less customisable degree. In Excel, pressing Ctrl-F will give you this dialogue box:

Excel 1

Press the Options button and you have some options for where you search and the form of the word:

Excel 2

This works the same in Excel 2007 and 2010.

Searching in Powerpoint using Ctrl-F

In Powerpoint, Ctrl-F gives you a small dialogue box:

Powerpoint

Again, you have enough options to be useful, but not the range of options you find in Word, and again, this works the same in Powerpoint 2007 and 2010.

Searching on web pages using Ctrl-F

I find this so useful, especially if I’m searching my own web pages for a word I’ve used or maybe misused (I used this a great deal in the great proof-reading to proofreading change I made a few years ago.

This varies according to the browser you’re using, but hitting Ctrl-F will always bring you up a search box of some kind:

website

  • In Firefox, the search box appears at the bottom of the screen and gives you the option to highlight all and match case
  • In Chrome, the search box appears at the top of the screen and gives you the option to search whole word only and match case
  • In Internet Explorer, the search box appears at the top of the screen but doesn’t give you any options

Please note that these options might change in future as the browsers are updated.

How to search a PDF using Ctrl-F

One of the few things that you can’t search using Ctrl-F is a pdf document. However, most readers (I use PDF-Exchange), as well as having their own search functionality on the page, will allow you to use Shift-Ctrl-F to search!

pdf 1

You have some options:

pdf 2

And it works in a similar way in Adobe, too.

If this doesn’t work, there is always a search function in your pdf reader itself, for example:

pdf

Searching anywhere using Ctrl-F

As well as the standard Microsoft Office products and web pages, you can often search other interfaces using Ctrl-F, too. For example, because my WordPress interface uses the web browser, I can search for words in posts I’m writing:

Wordpress

I can use it in Skype:

Skype

And I’ve even tried it in my transcription management software, ExpressScribe, and you can use it there, too!

express scribe

Today we’ve learned about how to use Ctrl-F to search almost anywhere in any type of document or application.

Coming soon – advanced searching in Word and Search & Replace / Go To.

———————

This is part of my series on how to avoid time-consuming “short cuts” and use Word in the right way to maximise your time and improve the look of your documents.

If you’ve enjoyed this post and/or found it useful, please take a moment to comment (I’ll just ask you to provide a name and email address; you don’t have to sign in to WordPress) and share the post using the buttons you can see below. Thank you!

Please note, these hints work with versions of Microsoft Word currently in use – Word 2003, Word 2007 and Word 2010, all for PC. Mac compatible versions of Word should have similar options. Always save a copy of your document before manipulating it. I bear no responsibility for any pickles you might get yourself into!

Find all the short cuts here

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

How to count the words in a PowerPoint 2007 presentation

I recently needed to know the word count in a PowerPoint presentation. In my case, this was because I charge my clients by the word, in the main, and needed to know how much to charge someone for editing her PowerPoint text. But I’m sure it will be useful in other cases, too, for example if you’re a student with a word count target.

And it’s NOT obvious. Plus it’s different in Word 2007 and Word 2010, of course.

So, this is what you do …

How do I count the words in a PowerPoint 2007 presentation?

Open your document and click on the big Office button in the top left (1)

Click on Prepare (2) (like that’s obvious!) then Properties (3). This will give you some of the document properties in a bar along the top (these vary according to how you set up your document in the first place):

And because nothing ever shows you what you want immediately, you then need to click on Document Properties then choose Advanced Properties from the drop down. Then, finally, you get …

A lovely dialogue box with all the properties you could ever want, including the word count.

Please note, these hints work with versions of Microsoft Powerpoint 2007, for PC. Mac compatible versions should have similar options. Always save a copy of your document before manipulating it. I bear no responsibility for any pickles you might get yourself into!

Related posts:

How do I count the number of words in a PowerPoint 2010 presentation?

How do I count the number of words in a PowerPoint 2013 presentation?

Find all the short cuts here

 

Tags: , , , ,

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,454 other followers