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Monthly Archives: March 2016

How do I print the gridlines in my spreadsheet in Excel 2007, 2010 and 2013?

When you’re printing an Excel spreadsheet, how do you make the gridlines print, too?

This article tells you how to print the gridlines automatically, working in the Page Layout Tab, in Excel 2007, 2010 and 2013 (screen shots are taken from Excel 2010).

With your spreadsheet open, go to the Page Layout tab and look to the right to find the Sheet Options area:

print headings

In this area, you can tick Print to make the gridlines appear when you print out the spreadsheet.

There are two things to note here:

  1.  You can also untick the View boxes so you can’t see the gridlines at all. I’m not sure why you might want to do this, but there it is.
  2. If you have used the borders option already to draw borders around some cells, if you print without ticking Print Gridlines, the borders you have added will print anyway; if you tick Print Gridlines, all of the gridlines and borders will print.

Adding customised borders to cells

A quick reminder on adding borders:

Click on the cell(s) you want to add borders to. Click on the Borders drop-down in the Home Tab, Font area:

apply borders excel

then choose where you want your borders to go:

border options excel

More sheet options

You will see that there’s a little arrow in the bottom right corner of the Sheet Options area:

sheet options

Click on this arrow and the Page Setup dialogue box opens – here you can change a few more options, too, or set your headings to print if you want to, as well as going into the other tabs to change the orientation or margins, etc.:

sheet options print gridlines

And that’s it – now you can print the row numbers and heading letters in Excel 2007, 2010 or 2013!

If this has been helpful, please comment below or share the article using the buttons. Thank you!

Related posts on this blog

How do I print the row numbers and column letters in my Excel spreadsheet?

How do I print the Excel header row on every page of my spreadsheet printout?

How do I print the Word header row on every page of my table printout?

 
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Posted by on March 23, 2016 in Excel

 

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Small business chat update – Ellie Levenson

Small business chat update – Ellie Levenson

Welcome to an update with Ellie Levenson from Fisherton Press. I first became aware of this lovely children’s publisher a little while ago when they did a KickStarter campaign to publish the great book, “The Election”, and I’ve been so pleased to see them going from strength to strength, and have recently bought a copy of their latest, “Pop“. So, when I first interviewed Ellie in November 2013, things were quite different, with just the one book out. By January 2015, it was all starting to take off, and everything has expanded since then, including her family (I have huge respect for people who work around family commitments and love hearing about how they cope, as so many self-employed people and small business owners have the same issues around juggling family and work). Last year, this was where Ellie wanted to be now: “Hopefully with a few books published, learning what works and what doesn’t, refining our processes, sticking to quality not quantity, perhaps even turning a profit…” Let’s see how Fisherton Press and Ellie herself are doing …

Hello again! Are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

Our initial interview was a little longer than a year ago and I have had a third child since then. I now have three kids under six so achieving anything beyond making sure everyone is fed, dressed and entertained is a challenge. But we managed to earn back our start-up costs and make a (small) profit last year and this year we have launched three new books, bringing our total to six.

Great news! What has changed and what has stayed the same?

I have scaled down my plans – three new books a year seems manageable – more doesn’t at the moment. But our aim to create books for children that adults also enjoy reading has stayed the same.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

I have learned a few things. That celebrity endorsements on social media sell more than any other form of marketing, That my initial plans to mostly work with journalists and media types who are good at their own PR was right, as it doesn’t matter how good a book is if the creators are not out there selling themselves. And that sometimes you just need a stroke of luck for your marketing to hit the right desk at the right time – that is what happened to us when a City Council ordered over 3,000 copies of our book The Election after receiving a targeted email at the same time as having to spend a pot of money on promoting voter participation. Although good luck comes to those who work hardest of course and I did spend many, many hours finding the right names and email addresses.

Any more hints and tips for people?

Work with friends, and make friends with those you work with, but don’t let friendship cloud your business judgement, And also make any decision you want to alone but always get material for publication proofread!

BONUS NEW QUESTION: What question would YOU like to ask other small business owners?

I don’t know about other small business owners but I would like to ask other publishers how they manage not to check their sales rankings obsessively.

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

More of the same and hopefully with foreign editions of some of our books.

I really do like the books from Fisherton Press – they’re very inclusive without being aggressively pi and holier than thou about it, and cover lovely and interesting and important topics. I wish Ellie and the Press the very best and can’t wait to see what comes out next.

You can buy the books direct from the Fisherton Press website as well as from bookshops and online sources. Fisherton Press and all of the books can be found at www.fishertonpress.co.uk and they are on Twitter and Instagram, too.

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured (I have a full roster of interviewees now so am only taking on a very few new ones). If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on March 19, 2016 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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How do I print row numbers and heading letters in Excel 2007, 2010 and 2013?

When you’re printing an Excel spreadsheet, how do you make the row numbers and heading letters print, too?

This article tells you how to do this, working in the Page Layout Tab, in Excel 2007, 2010 and 2013 (screen shots are taken from Excel 2010).

In your spreadsheet, go to the Page Layout tab and look to the right to find the Sheet Options area:

print headings

In this area, you can tick Print to make the headings (or, indeed, the gridlines) appear when you print out the spreadsheet. Note that if you want to, you can also untick the View boxes so you can’t see the headings. I’m not entirely sure why you wouldn’t want to see those, but the option is there.

You will see that there’s a little arrow in the bottom right corner of the Sheet Options area:

sheet options

Click on this arrow and the Page Setup dialogue box opens – here you can change a few more options, too, or set your headings to print if you want to, as well as going into the other tabs to change the orientation or margins, etc.:

sheet options print headings

And that’s it – now you can print the row numbers and heading letters in Excel 2007, 2010 or 2013!

If this has been helpful, please comment below or share the article using the buttons. Thank you!

Related posts on this blog

How do I print the Excel header row on every page of my spreadsheet printout?

How do I print the Word header row on every page of my table printout?

 
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Posted by on March 17, 2016 in Excel

 

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Small business chat update – Sophie Playle

Small business chat update – Sophie Playle

Welcome to an update with the lovely Sophie Playle from Liminal Pages, a fellow editor who has carved out a niche business in an interesting area of fiction and is also constantly invigorating her business with new ideas and directions. We first met Sophie in December 2013, at which point she’d only been going for eight months, and the relative youth of her business is certainly reflected in her energy and her seeking for new avenues – I found things settled down for me very much after about four years. Sophie’s January 2015 update saw her with big plans: Ah, the million dollar question. (Hmm, with a million dollars – or pounds – in the bank wouldn’t be a bad start.) But seriously. I have big plans for 2015. Unfortunately, the #VATMOSS mess has put a major spanner in the works. I’d hoped to branch out into offering products and courses for writers, and I still plan to do this, but I’m going to wait and let the dust settle on this #VATMESS thing for the time being, then figure out my next move from there. I may also set up a separate copywriting side-business. In short, though, I want to make sure I have enough diversity to keep me motivated, and I’m determined to reach a certain income goal, too. (Probably not a million dollars.)” Did she achieve those goals? Let’s find out. Oh, and I love Sophie’s bonus question – are you brave enough to answer it?

Hello again, Sophie! Are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

Not exactly.

I didn’t reach my income goal, though I still earned more than I had the previous year, despite also facing the difficulties of running my business on the road while I travelled through Europe for nine months (read about Sophie’s adventures in this post on her blog).

And though I launched an online course, it took a lot more time and effort than I had anticipated and didn’t yield the big results I’d hoped for! I learned a few valuable lessons through that venture, though – mostly the value of patience and realistic expectations.

A year ago, I’d also been toying with the idea of creating a separate copywriting business, but I decided against that in the end. Dividing my attention didn’t seem like a sensible option, and it wasn’t really wanted I wanted to do.

However, I still feel I made big leaps forward in my business last year – just ones I perhaps didn’t foresee a year ago!

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

I’ve had a BIG change this year in that I completely rebranded and renamed my business! I went from Playle Editorial Services to Liminal Pages.

I’m much happier with the new brand and feel it reflects both my niche of speculative fiction and my personality a bit more.

The services I offer – editing and manuscript critique – have stayed the same, but I now also offer a novel-writing course called Conquer Your Novel, which I’m planning to run again in the autumn. It’s an 8-week course with weekly feedback designed to help self-taught writers understand the theory behind writing a good novel and finish their books to a high standard.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

I’ve learned that if you want to offer online courses, you need to nurture a very different client base.

When you offer a service that requires a lot of time – such as editing a manuscript – you only need a single client to fill up several weeks’ of work. But when you run a course, your marketing efforts need to reach a lot more people, which is one reason I’m focusing more on developing my newsletter list.

But the biggest lesson I’ve learned this year is that it’s really not helpful – in fact, it can be psychologically detrimental – to surround myself with advice from a hundred different business advice gurus. It’s overwhelming. And no piece of advice will work for everyone.

Our businesses, our personalities and our needs are all different. It’s much more useful to listen to your instincts.

Any more hints and tips for people?

Look after yourself. Running a small business is hard, emotional work. Your health is the foundation of your success, so it’s worth being kind to yourself.

BONUS NEW QUESTION: What question would YOU like to ask other small business owners?

I’d like to know what one thing they’ve done that has had the biggest impact on their everyday workday – whether it’s a strategy they employ or a piece of software they use. Those things always interest me.

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

I’ve decided that I’d like to expand the Liminal Pages team.

Ideally, I’d love to work with a few excellent editors who share a similar work ethic. And while others take on more of the editorial work, I’ll be able to fully immerse myself in marketing and growing my business while also developing and running more courses.

For the first time ever, I feel very clear about the direction I want to take my business. Knowing me, though, this time next year I’ll have done something completely different!

I love Sophie’s top tip and I’m also excited by her bonus question – I’m going to be answering that myself in a comment, because we can always learn and refine what we do, even if we’ve been going for ages. It’s interesting to see that Sophie’s reached that point at which you diversify, specialise and/or expand, and I’ll look forward to seeing how she gets on with working with some more editors. I resolved this issue myself by developing a group of people to recommend on to (including Sophie) and forging a relationship with someone who does the same mix of work as I do to provide holiday and emergency cover. I’ll be very interested to hear about this different approach. But maybe it’ll all be going in a different direction again this time next year!

Sophie’s rebranded website is at liminalpages.com and that novel-writing course can be found here: Conquer Your Novel

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured. If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on March 12, 2016 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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How can I transcribe more quickly?

Because transcription is usually paid by the audio minute (i.e. if you have a 20 minute tape, you will be paid 20 x your per-minute rate), the faster (and more accurately) you transcribe, the more money you can make per hour. Here are some tips from my own experience about how you can transcribe more quickly. It’s not all about typing faster, either – it’s about typing faster and typing smarter and working smarter.

All links are to my own articles that explain the topics in greater depth.

Typing faster

One main way (but not the only way) to improve your transcription speed is to simply (ha!) type more quickly. Here are some tips on how to build your typing speed. The first one might surprise you ..

  • Number one tip: trim your fingernails.

I have studied this (because someone has to) and I can improve my typing speed by about 5% by trimming my nails. I can type more quickly when just the pads of my fingers are striking the keys. It also takes longer to wear the letters off your keys if you’ve not got long nails to scratch them …

  • If you’re serious about going into transcription, especially if you have a specialised medical or legal background where the fees are that bit higher, it’s worth investing in typing training – have a look at Pitman courses.
  • A decent keyboard will also help you to type more quickly. Have a look at my post on ergonomics and keyboards, as I cover that there in a lot of detail. But typing on a decent keyboard as opposed to bashing away at a laptop or netbook will improve your typing speed.
  • The more you type, the faster you’ll typically get, up to a point. So you might start off a bit slow, but your speed should pick up, if you’re touch-typing reasonably accurately.

Typing smarter

As well as physically typing faster, you can use technology to help you to transcribe more quickly and efficiently.

  • If you’re not using transcription management software, start doing so (read more on this here). This doesn’t do your typing for you, but it allows you to manage the speed of your tape and stop and start it in the most ergonomic way possible.
  • Use autocorrect to your advantage. I’ve written about this at length in another article, but these are the most important points for building speed and accuracy:
    • Set up common shortcuts right from the start – bec = because, w = with, nec = necessarily, etc. Add these are you come across them.
    • Set up any words you commonly misspell – you can do this when you’re spell-checking, as there’s an autocorrect option in the spell check dialogue box (I have trouble typing occurred correctly, for example).
    • As soon as you recognise commonly used words or phrases in your particular tape, get them into the autocorrect. Long album titles? The name of a big exhibition the artist is working on? Moisturiser and concealer in a set of interviews assessing makeup? If they come up more than twice, create an autocorrect for them.
    • If you’re typing the names of people in the conversation, have a convention, e.g. aa for the interviewer, bb for the first interviewee, change the autocorrected text for that shortcut for each tape (e.g. aa might be Interviewer for one tape, Manager for another, Anita for a third, bb might be Interviewee, Employee or Jane), and always use the same shortcut for the main and secondary person, so it’s super-easy to remember what to type.
  • How about using voice recognition software? This has got a way to go, and editing it, in my experience, takes as long as transcribing in the first place.

Working smarter

This is mainly around the things that delay you in doing the work – looking things up and distractions.

  • I look things up when I’m transcribing – band names, place names, etc. It’s far more professional to provide a transcription with the facts checked and anything you can’t hear or are unsure of marked. Make looking things up work the way you need it to:
    • I find it easist to look them up as I go along, you might finid that disturbs the flow. Do what’s best for you.
    • I have found from experience that if I can’t hear a word, especially a technical term or proper noun, often the interviewer will ask the interviewee to spell it out … just after I’ve spent ages looking it up. So let the tape run a bit and see if it helps you pick that information up without spending time searching for it.
  • I type for an hour at the very most, as after that length of time my posture droops and my typing slows. It might only be a stretch and a march up and down the stairs, but do break it up a bit. Read more about ergonomics here.
  • I do need to have the Internet turned on while transcribing, because I need to look things up, but I’m careful not to answer phone calls or even look at emails until my break. Nothing is that urgent it can’t wait, and three minutes spent looking at something, plus the time it takes to get back in the transcription zone, can lose a few minutes per hour of transcribing. It all builds up!

A final thought

I hope these tips have helped to give you some ideas about how to transcribe more quickly and efficiently. Here are two final thoughts …

  1. If you’re reading this and you’re a journalist or researcher, not a professional typist, especially if you can’t touch type, it’s probably a better idea for you to explore finding a transcriber to do it for you than to try to get faster. I can often transcribe a tape up to twice as fast as a non-professional, freeing my clients up to do their real jobs!
  2. However quickly you type, ALWAYS assume a job is going to take slightly longer than you think. Why do you think this is being posted on Thursday morning instead of Wednesday afternoon …?

If you’ve found this article useful OR if you have more tips for transcribing more quickly, please do comment below – I always love to hear from my readers! There are sharing buttons there, too, so you can share this on whatever social media platforms you use. Thank you!

Other useful articles on this blog

How do you start a career in transcription? – are you suited for it?

The professional transcriber – the technology you need

10 top tips for transcribers – what every new transcriber needs to know

Why do you need human transcribers, anyway? – I explain why!

Keyboards, ergonomics and RSI – the risks and keeping safe

Transcribing multiple voices – hints to make it easier

Why do transcribers charge by the audio minute? – explains it all

 
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Posted by on March 10, 2016 in Business, Transcription, Word

 

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Small business chat update – Paul Alborough / Professor Elemental

Small business chat update – Paul Alborough / Professor Elemental

Welcome to an update with the lovely and always entertaining (well, that is his job … ) Paul Alborough, aka Professor Elemental. We’ve been having these chats now since February 2013, catching up with him in February 2014 and February 2015 (now I’m feeling bad that this got scheduled in March!) he’s always keeping busy and adding extra strings to his bow – last year, he put out the excellent novel, “Letters Between Gentlemen” and this year there was a new album, “Apequest” which reminded me of Paul Magrs’ “Brenda and Effie” books with its guest appearances by other folk from the worlds of fantasy and sci fi. But even when you’re a globe-trotting rapper in a pith helmet, you still have business concerns. Last year, this was his plan: “Having experimented with releasing comics, novels, toys and card games alongside the music, this is the year where I want to try tying it all together. My aim is to create a project that tells a story using every medium I have at my disposal, while also involving all of my favourite creative friends that I have worked with so far. Even better, if I can get the crowdfunding right, I can ensure that we all get paid for our work, too. It’s the biggest thing that i have ever attempted though, so wish me luck!” and this did result in Apequest, so that was great news, and this year he’s thinking about all sorts of things.

Oh, and can you answer his Extra Question? I’d love to get some discussion going with advice from other small business chat folks and other business people out there …

Hello again, Paul. It’s always lovely to have you on the blog. So, are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

I am! Hooray! I did manage to complete my ambitious ‘concept album’, alongside a comic and video and it proved to be the most creatively satisfying project I have ever completed. However, in my enthusiasm, I didn’t spend quite the amount of time I should have on the business side of things, so it was a creative and collaborative triumph and a business minefield.

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

I’ve definitely achieved a lot of ambitions and hit a lot of personal targets last year – everything from performing with a live band to creating games and toys based on the Professor-  but I remain delighted to find that things are largely the same, albeit with the collection of muppet figures on my desk threatening to take over completely.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

I went all out with collaborations this year, saying yes to everyone and anything, with mixed results. On the one hand I was lucky enough to make some really fun music and created some unique merchandise, which really lifted the year. On the other hand, the thinner you spread yourself, the less focussed you can end up – I missed some of the important but unexciting details of certain projects, or worse still, delegated them without issuing proper instructions, and it cost me dearly. Finding myself with a pile of overpriced merch or shelling out more to contributors than I was making from a project was a painful learning experience!

Any more hints and tips for people?

Freestyling in front of a time lord is a nerve-wracking experience, be wary of gifts when performing a service in a psychedelic church, mescaline is not to be taken lightly, faery folk make for magic audiences, don’t let your ego outshine your business sense, if you have a chance to see ‘Mouse’ perform again… don’t,  the best parts of Glastonbury are round the back, Canada smells of maple syrup and kindness, your biggest nemesis can easily end up your best friend, there are few finer sights than a conga line at a fetish club.

BONUS NEW QUESTION: What question would YOU like to ask other small business owners?

How do you successfully delegate work? What tricks have you got for growing your business, but still retaining control?

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

I will probably keep things slightly more simple this year overall.  In amongst the busiest year of shows yet, I’d like to try to diversify – try more writing and some voice work beyond the Professor. I still love life on the road, but it might be nice to see what I can achieve without leaving my house.

Some great honest lessons learned there and good plans for the future. It is hard, especially when you’re creative, to keep control of all the little things. I often think I’ve done OK with my business and kept everything pretty well under control because I was an administrator for years and years – it certainly helps to have that (maybe less creative!) mindset when it comes to the details. But as long as you learn from things, that’s what matters. And Paul’s experiences remind me of other creative people’s in the interviews, so it must be a common feature that needs to be kept careful tabs on. It must be so easy to get caught up in the moment when you’re doing so much fabulous stuff and amazing collaborations, though!

But who can beat those marvellous hints and tips? I’m looking forward to finding out what the Professor gets up to this year!

APEQUEST: the new Professor Elemental adventure is available at www.professorelemental.com, and you can find all manner of things there, including artwork, tea and T-shirts. You can also find Paul / Professor Elemental on Twitter and Facebook.

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured. If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on March 5, 2016 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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