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Author Archives: Liz Dexter

About Liz Dexter

Writer, proofreader, editor, transcriber. Also runner, gym-goer and BookCrosser! My married name is Liz Dexter but my maiden name and the name on my books is Liz Broomfield.

Small business chat – Amanda Brown

Small business chat – Amanda Brown

Today I’m excited to feature the lovely Amanda Brown with her marvellous, crafty invention, Treasure Toyz Ltd, that helps keep your kids safe when you’re out and about. Amanda is in my neck of the woods soon, attending the top Home and Gift Retail Trade Show, Autumn Fair 2017 3-6 September at the National Exhibition Centre. Amanda’s a classic example of someone being made redundant and starting their own business, although in her case what she does now hasn’t been informed by what she has done before, but by her own family traditions. Let’s find out how she started, how it’s been going and how she ended up exhibiting at this big show … 

Hello, Amanda, and welcome to the interview series. What’s your business called? When did you set it up?

The company is Treasure Toyz Ltd, and it was established in September 2015.

What made you decide to set up your own business?

I was made redundant from my Oil & Gas recruitment position when the oil price plummeted. I hadn’t been enjoying my job for some time but didn’t move due to it being work I was used to, and also a salary I was used to, but when I got made redundant, I saw it as an opportunity to try something myself.

What made you decide to go into this particular business area?

When I was young, I was never allowed out the house without all of my Mum’s contact details pinned on to me in one way or the other … and when my friends started having kids, I witnessed them scribbling their number down their arm with pen and drilling them with meeting places and remembering phone numbers. I am very crafty, so bought some beads and started making up bracelets for friends’ children. After finding a lost boy and not knowing what to do, I knew this was a daily problem around the world, and it just went from there.

Had you run your own business before?

Yes, I had a bar in Spain for a while – so a little bit of a different industry!

I’ll say! How did you do it? Did you launch full-time, start off with a part-time or full-time job to keep you going … ?

I jumped in the deep end after being made redundant. The business was originally called “Phone My Mum” and I handmade all of the bracelets and accessories. Orders started coming from New Zealand, Italy, the States – everywhere via my Etsy and Amazon shops. But as it got busier, I realised the company couldn’t scale up if they were all to be handmade. I used to do a lot of stalls and parents kept telling me they would love to be able to make the accessories with the kids. So, I started to create a box where children could make their own – and bang, Treasure was born!

What do you wish someone had told you before you started?

Everything takes at least twice as long and costs twice as much than you originally think.

What would you go back and tell your newly entrepreneurial self?

Stop constantly looking for advice and opinions, trust your instincts and remember that nobody knows your business more than you!

What do you wish you’d done differently?

Taken bigger risks earlier.

What are you glad you did?

Adapted the business as I went along. Although I was busy, I would not have achieved my goals I have for myself and the business.

What’s your top business tip?

Say yes to every opportunity and work out how the heck you are going to do it later!

How has it gone since you started? Have you grown, diversified or stayed the same?

I have certainly grown in the waistline, anyway, having a beautiful baby boy a year into opening the business!

No, but seriously, I have grown as a person. I went from having a very comfortable lifestyle to living back in a little town, travelling by bus at first and not getting my nails done every two weeks. When you first start up and put everything into your business, the little luxuries go and you quickly realise you can easily live without the things you thought you could never live without! Starting a business has certainly humbled me and changed me for the better.

Where do you see yourself and your business in a year’s time?

I see myself still in Ayrshire with a factory to assemble all my boxes. My boxes being sold across the UK and just emerging into Europe. The next loom bands – here we go!

Fantastic stuff – and you can see that exhibiting at Autumn Fair is part of this big push to expansion. It’s all very exciting, and I love Amanda’s bravery, willingness to take risks but acceptance of the personal changes the business has brought, too. Best of luck to her, and do pop along to see her at Autumn Fair if you are in the area – tell her Liz sent you!

Amanda’s Treasure Toyz website is at www.treasuretoyz.com and she also has a Facebook page. You can email her, too.

Details for the Autumn Fair, which runs from 3-6 September, with 30,000 retailers from across Europe, can be found here (Amanda’s in Hall 5, 5A76)

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured (I have a full roster of interviewees now so am only taking on a very few new ones). If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on August 19, 2017 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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irrupt or erupt?

irrupt or erupt?

 

This one was suggested by my husband, a keen birdwatcher (see below for why that’s relevant) and adder of troublesome pairs to my list.

Erupt is perhaps the better-known of the two. To erupt is to forcefully throw out rocks, lava, gas and ash, if you’re a volcano. The next meaning is to break out suddenly, usually used of something like a fight, and similarly, you can erupt into laughter, meaning it happens suddenly and forcefully. Finally, a spot or rash erupts when it appears suddenly on the skin, and a tooth erupts through a gum when it grows in your mouth and becomes visible.

To irrupt, also a verb, means to burst into somewhere, to enter suddenly or even forcibly. The kind of thing people do when they break down a door. Interestingly, I’ve seen people being described as “erupting” in this sense, but let’s use irrupt here if we can, to preserve those two senses, yes? The second (and husband-relevant) meaning is to migrate into an area in large – that’s abnormally large – numbers, and it’s especially used of birds. So when an awful lot of waxwings descended on some trees with berries in a Birmingham car park, that was them irrupting. Or an irruption.

You can find more troublesome pairs here, and here’s the index to them all!

 
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Posted by on August 16, 2017 in Errors, Language use

 

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Small business chat update – Sarah Banks

Small business chat update – Sarah Banks

It’s Small Business Chat update time with Sarah Banks from Banks’ Business Solutions. Sarah joined this interview series in April 2015 when I was impressed by her dedication to helping people, particularly women, with email newsletters and websites, and ethically, too (not always the standard, unfortunately). We caught up with Sarah in July 2016 and when I asked her where she wanted to be by now, she said, “Offering the same services but with a team of at least 2 other part-time VAs supporting me so that I can take on more clients and have a more strategic view of the business going forward.” So how’s she doing now?

Hello again, Sarah. Are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

Yes, the business is growing rapidly and I’ve recently been announced as a finalist for the Biz Mums Exceptional Service Award, which I am really pleased about.

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

I now have two associates working for me as well as working closely with a copy writer and social media marketing expert. This has enabled me to have more time to focus on growing the business and networking as well as being able to do more 1-1 WordPress support which is something I love doing.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

I wish I’d had more trust to go out and look for associates, my business is all about outsourcing but I found it really hard to do that for myself. By building a team around me, I now feel less stressed and have more time to focus on growing and developing my business further.

Any more hints and tips for people? 

Network more, even if it is online by sharing videos on social media. One of my clients came to me via word of mouth and by having seen my online presence which just goes to show that social media can have a huge effect on your brand awareness. It really is true that people buy from people.

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

This time next year my family and I are going to be going travelling for 3 months so I see the business in a position that will allow me time to travel whilst dipping in and out when I can. I plan to increase my client base to be able to offer more hours to my associates and to have more distinct services so that people can really see the ways in which working with me can benefit them.

Wow – that’s an exciting plan, and one which I’m sure will work out really well – Sarah looks to have everything under control! It is hard to find people to trust: I only recommend clients to people I know or have worked with myself after making one recommendation led to a deadline being missed, so I appreciate how difficult that aspect is.

You can find Sarah at Banks’ Business Solutions on the web at www.banksbusinesssolutions.co.uk or you can phone her on 07736 938 480, email her or find her on Facebook or Twitter.

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured (I have a full roster of interviewees now so am only taking on a very few new ones). If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on August 12, 2017 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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How do customers get in touch?

How do customers get in touch?

How do your customers get in touch with you? What should you do to help them get in contact? Where should you be visible and how are people likely to message you? You might be surprised …

Be where your customers are

There’s a good general rule that you should be where your customers are. That means physically as well as virtually.

  • If people buy your type of thing at craft fairs and in shops, go to craft fairs and establish a presence in a few shops (many crafty shops will rent shelf space and/or take a commission. Take advice from other crafters on tips for choosing fairs – I have no idea about this myself)
  • If your clients hang out in Pinterest or Instagram, make sure you have an account there, you use it on-brand and wisely, and you put your contact details on your profile
  • Most people will do a web search when they’re looking for what you sell or provide – make sure you have a website, even if it’s just a landing page with contact, product and service details.
  • I strongly suggest you add a contact form to your website. Most blogging platforms and website services like WordPress will have contact form templates for you to use.
  • Many people will look on Facebook so make sure you have a Facebook page even if you don’t interact with it very much.
  • If you have a Twitter profile, again, get those contact details on it.
  • If you can’t help someone, try to pass them to someone who can.

How do customers contact me?

I’ve been observing how people have contacted me about genuine paid work opportunities over the past few months. Here are the ways they’ve done it:

  • Contact form on my website – this is the main way in which people contact me. It comes straight through to my email, with the person’s email, so I can reply straight back to them
  • Email – my email address is on my website, so I assume people pick it up from there, if they’re not a recommendation who has been given my email address by someone else
  • Twitter – a public @ message – so make sure your Twitter account is open and allows messages
  • Facebook – a question on my business page – make sure you enable alerts so you can see when these come through to you!
  • Facebook – a Facebook Messenger request – these can get lost in “Other” messages – check that folder regularly
  • Twitter – a direct message. This can only be sent by someone you mutually follow on Twitter but they still happen – watch out for alerts
  • Phone – I have a dedicated mobile phone with its number on my website. I receive very few phone calls and because I leave my phone on voicemail most of the time (because I do a lot of work where I really have to concentrate), people who leave messages tend to email me as well anyway.

Other ways people might contact you:

  • At networking events
  • Through any messaging facilities on other social media sites
  • By text message

The golden rules of social media contact

I’ve covered this in depth in an article about reciprocity but in general:

  • Always respond to people who contact you – it’s only polite
  • Take the conversation out of the public eye if it’s about prices and services
  • Always be super-polite, even if it seems like someone is trying to get at you
  • Do set expectations – if you’re not going to work weekends / late nights, maybe don’t reply to messages so quickly at the weekend or late at night, to set an expectation of office hours only (be prepared to make exceptions for a real jewel of a prospect, however!)

Summary: make yourself as available as you can; you never know where that lead will come from

Create yourself a website with a contact form as well as a list of contact details

Establish a presence on the very popular social media sites

Establish a presence on any social media sites that are relevant to your area of work

Always answer queries, taking them privately as soon as you can

Set expectations

If you can’t do a job for someone, try to recommend someone who can


In this article I’ve reminded you to keep as many avenues open as possible for people to contact you, and to follow that up by being responsive.

Other relevant articles on this blog

Reciprocity and social media

Coopetition versus competition

 

 
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Posted by on August 9, 2017 in Business, Social media

 

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Small business chat – Laura Hecht

Small business chat – Laura Hecht

Much excitement in Libro Towers – there’s been an influx of NEW interviewees recently, and here’s the first. I do get spaces in the schedule sometimes, as people drop out for lovely reasons like being too busy to sit down and answer the questions (although really you should never be too busy to keep up the marketing, it does happen), inexplicable ones to me like going back into employment, or sad ones like closing the business. So let’s welcome Laura Hecht and her partner Eyal, who run stationery and decorative craft supplies company Lau&Home. Crafters and stationery buffs will want to look at this very pretty website immediately, but do read the interview, too!

Welcome, Laura! Let’s start off with the basics. What’s your business called? When did you set it up?

The company is called Lau&Home and the business was set up in 2013.

What made you decide to set up your own business?

I got tired of working long hours and spending 50% of my life in an office, knowing that my financial future would hit the “glass ceiling” if I continued being an employee. I wanted to create, invent, lead, be part of the foundation of something. I wanted to be a good, considerate boss to my future employees (better than the ones I had). I decided to take a risk and dedicate 100% of my time to make this business grow. Despite all the comments and criticism from relatives and friends after leaving my “well paid real job”, my husband and I were very determined to make this work.

What made you decide to go into this particular business area?

I really like DIY decoration and love colourful stuff. I think that people can do better designs themselves, using a bit of imagination, than the items that cost hundreds of pounds in the big chains. We decided to start selling products that we liked and would have bought ourselves.

Had you run your own business before?

No. I was feeling too comfortable to leave for a new adventure. Up until the moment I made up my mind to make a change, it was too scary for me. But waking up Mondays and wishing it was Friday made me realise that it was about my life, my time.

How did you do it? Did you launch full-time, start off with a part-time or full-time job to keep you going … ?

In the very beginning, my husband and I made the decision to start our own business so I quit my job and we lived on one salary only while I was building and learning all about our future company. We started slowly buying items and selling them. After a year approximately, we had a little turn over so my husband left his job too to dedicate his time exclusively to our project. Money was very tight in the beginning but our first Christmas gave us a boost that helped a lot to keep moving. We always remember the first box of tapes that we got from the supplier: we took a picture of it and got afraid and excited at the same time! Today, having 1,000 square foot of storage, that seems like a dream.

What do you wish someone had told you before you started?

Take a break from people who drag you down. They are afraid that you will make their dream come true yourself, so they will try to pass on their fears to you.

Be confident with decisions but don’t push it too far too early. Being profitable and getting into the business can take time, so be patient. Big, bad decisions can take you out of the game too early.

What would you go back and tell your newly entrepreneurial self?
Do it and gradually. If you can, have savings so you won’t be too stressed.

In the beginning, you probably won’t have a lot of money, don’t get unmotivated too soon!

Use your time wisely and don’t get lazy!

What do you wish you’d done differently?

We made some mistakes managing the stock. We got too comfortable with the income and didn’t check carefully the market (competitors, demands, etc.), so we got stuck with a lot of non-moving stock which created a bad cash flow. We would have handled that more carefully.

What are you glad you did?

Took the decision to do it! It’s an incredible journey that hopefully will last for a long time.

What’s your top business tip?

Make a plan. Not too complicated, but it’s good to see the numbers in front of you. If it’s not good, confront it. Find the way to do it better AND don’t ignore the problems. They won’t disappear if you won’t solve them. Now you are the one in charge.

How has it gone since you started? Have you grown, diversified or stayed the same?

We’ve had a great three years and grown in a way we didn’t imagine, from a couple of boxes in the living room to our own industrial unit. But it’s not always like this: expect some periods of steady or small growth. Don’t panic, use this time to improve what you already have. You will be surprised how much you can do better with what you have.

Where do you see yourself and your business in a year’s time?

Hopefully we will keep growing. We will have a bigger place, more employees and stock. We will create new lines of products. We hope to be able to inspire as many people as possible.

Wow – what a lovely, confident and growing business – but looking back to the beginning, they did it all very carefully, living within their means on one salary and only going into it full-time for both of them when the turnover started to rise. I love all the nuggets of advice, too. A fabulous journey and I can’t wait to see what happens next!

You can find the lovely Lau&Home website at www.lauhome.com and they are also on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram. That’s a lot of lovely washi tape and polkadots and bunting and so much more!

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured (I have a full roster of interviewees now so am only taking on a very few new ones). If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on August 5, 2017 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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Surfeit or surplus?

Surfeit or surplus?

This Troublesome Pair was suggested to me by my husband. He’s good at coming up with these; I’m not sure how many have been suggested  by him over the years. Both of these words mean an excess, but one just means “more” while the other means “too much!” There are some interesting archaic terms, too. For example, I always ‘knew’ that “King John died of a surfeit of lampreys” but I didn’t know exactly what that word meant, thinking it was standing for just “too much of” rather than a more specific meaning.*

A surplus is the amount that’s left over when you’ve met all your requirements. So if you have a bag of broad beans to cover every week for the next year and you will carry on with your next harvest once those are used up, anything over 52 bags is your surplus. In accounting terms, it means the positive difference between income/assets and expenditure over a period, so if I earn £100 from selling broad beans but spend £30 on bags to sell them in, my surplus is £70. And in even more specific accounting terms, it means the amount by which a company’s assets are worth more than the face value of its stock.

So a surplus doesn’t really carry the idea of TOO MUCH, whereas a surfeit is the “too much” one. It just really means an excess, but it isn’t really used in a positive sense (unless you’ve found examples – do share if you have). And in archaic terms, it was an illness that was caused by excessive drinking or eating – so King John’s “surfeit” wasn’t an excess of lampreys but the illness brought on by having eaten the excess of lampreys. If we go back to our broad beans, although it’s subjective, I’d say that having, for example, 104 bags of broad beans when you only need 52 would count as having a surfeit.

I do love these small distinctions. Interestingly, surfeit and surplus both come from Latin via Middle English (thank you, OED), so it’s not one of those cases where we have one Germanic and one Latinate word for the same thing.

And the obsession with vegetable produce? Blame the people who presumably have allotments and keep leaving courgettes out on walls and the pavement for people to take and runners to trip over / jump.

*Edited to add: Oh, deary me. I have been informed by reader Ian Johnston that “It was Henry I that died from a surfeit of lampreys, John fined the City of Gloucester for failing to deliver him a lamprey pie at Christmas; a dearth not a surfeit of lampreys”. Thank you to Ian for pointing that out and I stand corrected!

You can find more troublesome pairs here, and here’s the index to them all! The index is finally UP TO DATE so go and have a look and tell me which is your favourite so far!

 
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Posted by on August 3, 2017 in Errors, Language use

 

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Small business chat update – Suzi Brown

Small business chat update – Suzi Brown

Hello! It’s time for another Small Business Update. Do you enjoy reading these? Please do comment or like the article if you do! Today, we’re catching up with Suzi Brown from The Smart Bear Digital Consultancy, who I first chatted to in June 2014  and again in July 2015 and July 2016. When I asked her then, with her business growing fast, having moved into an office and with lots of ideas floating around, she said, “Judging by how we have grown in this year, I expect my turnover will be at least 50% more – perhaps we’ll need bigger offices!” Read on to see how she’s done in the past year …

Hello again, Suzi. So, are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

Yes, business has doubled since this time last year and it’s going from strength to strength in both terms of website builds, WordPress development and search engine optimisation.

Wow! What has changed and what has stayed the same?

We’ve introduced new services and streamlined our products, introducing a new customer service system to make everything go smoothly from start to finish. We also took this step with our systems because a new member of staff is starting with us in September and we wanted to make it as easy as possible for her to hit the ground running.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

I’ve learned to constantly evolve the company to make it more efficient, which has been essential with the amount of work coming in. We’ve also learned that it’s OK to advertise. Up until now we’ve never advertised as we’ve always had a steady stream of work and didn’t think we’d cope with any huge influx. But, now we can handle a lot more and so we’ve placed an advert in a local business magazine to off our advertising journey.

Any more hints and tips for people?

We’ve enjoyed moving our systems to a CRM (Customer Relationship Management) system which has a lot of useful built-in tools – tools we were using several different systems for before. Although we have to pay for the CRM, it’s been really worthwhile and makes us more efficient and professional, and saves time in the long run.

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

Next year, we’ll have our new member of staff installed and I think the business will have evolved again, organically, in tune with her talents and strengths.

What a fabulous and exciting time for Smart Bear and Suzi! It’s always a good idea to keep an eye on developing your business and streamlining systems, but especially in those early years. But it’s exciting, too, and I wish them all the best of luck with that first hire (new offices last year, first member of staff this year: it’s all looking good!)

You can find Suzi and Smart Bear Digital Consultancy here:

Suzi Brown
07927533075
www.thesmartbear.co.uk
Email Suzi
Facebook
Twitter
Google+

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured (I have a full roster of interviewees now so am only taking on a very few new ones). If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on July 29, 2017 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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