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Small business chat update – Kath Kilburn

Small business chat update – Kath Kilburn

It’s Small Business Chat Update time again (a bit late today, sorry!) – so say hello to Kath Kilburn from wool shop Three Bags Full. We first met Kath in June 2014, and updated in May 2015, when her bricks-and-mortar shop came under threat (through no fault of her own), and she was still uncertain in May 2016, but she’s still going strong with her online presence and maintaining her role in the knitting community. This time last year, when I asked her where she saw herself in a year’s time, she replied “At the moment it’s really difficult to say. We’ll be doing some SEO work on the website to make it more visible and adjusting the lines we have on offer and see how it goes from there. Watch this space!” So, how’s she doing now?

Hello again, Kath. So, are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

We were in such a state of flux last year that I’m not sure I had much of an idea where I’d be but, since we closed our bricks and mortar shop, I’ve been adding more items to our website, have started selling completed garments on folksy (I did this especially in the run up to Christmas), have identified an extra regular craft market to frequent, have sold yarn once a month in the foyer of our old building in Halifax and have finished a new, short ebook about the shop closure – so I haven’t been sitting around! I’m also considering a pop-up shop later in the year if it’s feasible.

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

The major change was closing the shop; still the same is the running of the website, although we’ve re-jigged the stock to some extent. I’ve also continued to meet up with the lovely knitters from what was originally the shop’s knitgroup.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

I wish I’d known everything would be (kind of) okay after such a major change and how much I’d appreciate being able to spend more time on writing, which is the other thing I enjoy.

Any more hints and tips for people?

I really wouldn’t advise anyone to take business advice from me!

Where do you see yourself and your business in a year’s time?

I think we’ll still be doing the same stuff; I’m finding the mix of different things we’re doing now really enjoyable. I’m probably more suited to it than I am to doing the same thing in the same place all the time. Having said that, as a general thing, I think it’s sad that so many little specialist shops are closing – we need independents to make our high streets interesting and unique.

Bonus question – What would I like to ask other new small business owners?

I’d be interested in which parts of their jobs other business owners hive off. For me, I’m so unsuited to the technical side of things (setting up the website, etc) and the accountancy side (preparing the tax return) that I’m happy to pay someone to do those parts of the work for me. I sure there are some great people out there who’ll successfully tackle anything, but I’d sooner concentrate on the crafty and organisational bits of the job – the bits I know I can do reasonably well

I stopped asking the bonus question after a year as I wasn’t getting the feedback I was hoping for from other business owners, but I think this one is totally valid. I am OK at the organisational side of things because I was an administrator for years of my career before I started  my business, but for creative people this can be a real issue. I’m glad Kath’s doing OK, though!

You can find Kath’s website at www.threebagsfulluk.com *there’s a Folksy button on the web page where you can find seasonal items) and call her on 07941133155 or email her if you want to get in touch. You can also read her e-books, “So You’d Like to Open a Wool Shop…“ and “So, That Wool Shop We Opened ...”.

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured (I have a full roster of interviewees now so am only taking on a very few new ones). If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on May 20, 2017 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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Small business chat update – Ellie Levenson

Small business chat update – Ellie Levenson

Welcome to a very timely update with Ellie Levenson from Fisherton Press. I first became aware of her fantastic children’s publishing initiative a few years  ago when they did a KickStarter campaign to publish the great book, “The Election“, which basically explains elections to small people and is hugely relevant and in the news right now, of course, with a general election within the month!

I first interviewed Ellie in November 2013, and checked in with her in January 2015 and March 2016. At that point, she said that where she wanted to be by now (not knowing there would be a general election around the corner!) was: “More of the same and hopefully with foreign editions of some of our books”. So if you have a toddler or slightly older child, do pop and have a look at The Election, I passed copies to small people I know and they enjoyed it, and it’s the only thing out there that explains it all for that age group as far as I can tell. And meanwhile, let’s see how Ellie’s getting on running her publishing company and combining that with busy family life. 

Hello, Ellie, lovely to talk to you again and well done for all the great books! Are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

No – I thought we would have published our next few books (our last books came out in 2015) but I decided to give myself another year of maternity leave and just keep things ticking over – our third child is now 18 months and will be our last so I want to enjoy him as well as have time for our older two. But I am hoping to publish the next three next year. Also I didn’t really plan for there being an early General Election so have had to come up with a marketing plan on the hoof for our election book for kids, The Election. Still it’s getting lots of parliamentarian and celebrity endorsements so it’s going ok despite that, and became an Amazon bestseller the week the election was announced.

What would you go back and tell your newly entrepreneurial self?

Don’t try to do too much.

What do you wish you’d done differently?

Nothing really – even the mistakes have been fun and not too disastrous.

What are you glad you did?

The Election book – before I set up the company and decided to publish it myself it had been turned down by loads of agents and publishers but it has sold thousands and continues to do really well. And every time there is an election there should be a new generation of pre-schoolers ready for a copy.

What’s your top business tip?

Celebrity endorsements sell more than anything else!

How has it gone since you started? Have you grown, diversified or stayed the same?

Stayed the same – but that was the plan. I wanted a small business I could do alone. I am thinking about adding a few adult books to our list though which would be a diversification. And we are going to make some titles available abroad soon.

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

Nothing has changed yet!

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

It’s been a deliberately quiet year so nothing really this year – though perhaps I should have expected the unexpected when it came to elections.

Any more hints and tips for people?

Don;t put off the boring bits as they need to be done too.

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

Hopefully we’ll just have released our next three books and be getting excited about those…

You can buy the books direct from the Fisherton Press website as well as from bookshops and online sources (including Amazon and Hive – those are the links for The Election). Fisherton Press and all of the books can be found at www.fishertonpress.co.uk and they are on Twitter and Instagram, too.

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured (I have a full roster of interviewees now so am only taking on a very few new ones). If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on May 13, 2017 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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Small business chat update – Shelly Terry

Small business chat update – Shelly Terry

Welcome to another update from one of our crafty ladies – this time Shelly Terry from hand-made card company, Evelyn Mae, We first met Shelly back in in February 2013,  and then updated with her in March 2014, February 2015 and most recently, April 2016. I’ve really enjoyed watching Shelly’s story unfold – last year she was working around having a young baby, and this year she has different challenges to face. Is she where she expected to be – “I imagine I will still be open but still only taking incoming orders, and not actively advertising. Keeping the pressure off and spending time with my daughter.”? Read on to find out …

Hello Shelly, and welcome back! So, are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

Yes, I have had a very busy Christmas period, and an unexpected amount of corporate design work on, but all work which I didn’t advertise for, which is great, and what I had planned for.

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

Much is the same as last year, although I have a better routine with my daughter’s naps, which is helping me to plan my work time better. I feel the business hasn’t grown in any directed way, although it is organically growing through word of mouth and repeat customers which I am very happy about.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

I would like to have known that I would still put pressure on myself to build the business and have a good home life! I am learning that I can achieve all of it a little better if I let off the pressure of working, and keep some free time to not do anything – and enjoy it!

Any more hints and tips for people?

When you are working in your children’s naps, there is a tendency to not leave any time at all for a hot cup of tea or watching TV!  I would say to make sure you have down time in the naps, as well as productive work.  Work benefits from you relaxing, as well as yourself.

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

Next year I have a feeling it will all change when my daughter starts to drop her naps- I am hoping this is the same time she can attend nursery, so I can still have some designated work hours, but we shall see!

I admire Shelly’s resilience in keeping her business going and agree that organic growth through recommendations and repeat business is an excellent way to grow – it’s rare to not get the work if you’re recommended for it, I find. Good luck to Shelly through this next exciting period!

You can find Shelly’s work online at www.evelynmae.co.uk (with links on there to other crafting sites where she has a presence, such as Etsy). She has a blog on that site, too, and you can also find her on Facebook.

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured. If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
 

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Small business chat update – Kathy Ennis

Small business chat update – Kathy Ennis

Welcome to an update with Kathy Ennis of LittlePiggy, formerly Kathy Ennis: Your Brand is You. Kathy joined this interview series in n May 2012 and updated her story in July 2013 and August 2014. We last chatted in February 2016, and at that point, when asked where she wanted to be in a year’s time, Kathy said, “You reminded me, Liz, that in 2014 I said “Bigger, better, bolder!” and to be honest I don’t believe I can think of anything better so I am going to stick with it through 2016.” So, is she bigger, better and bolder this time round? Read on to find out.

Hello again, Kathy, and welcome back. Are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

Not really. During 2015/16 I realised that my business had moved in a slightly different direction. Although I was still working with business owners on their brand / personal branding, I was also being asked to help with their engagement marketing and general business systems and processes. Also, increasingly, I was delivering training in these areas for both organisations and enterprise agencies.

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

The upshot of these changes was, in the summer of 2016, I decided to rename my business to reflect these changes. I also carried out a complete overhaul of the brand and key messaging. The upshot is my new business: LittlePiggy.

I am still working 1-2-1 with clients, but I now work closely with a few Enterprise Agencies on the delivery of their mentoring and training programmes. This is the side of the business that I want to grow.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

I don’t think I learned anything in 2015/16 that I didn’t know – because what I did is what I work through with my clients – but it has given me more practical advice and experience that I can impart to my clients.

Any more hints and tips for people?

Plan any changes fully. Because I sat down and worked out precisely what I wanted / needed to happen; the timescale; researched people / organisations to outsource to (web design etc.) it all went really smoothly. It only took two weeks for it all to happen once the planning was complete.

Biggest tip: When planning, have many, many post-it notes, and be prepared to use them all

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

I may be moving home in the next 12-months so, although I am planning, things may be disrupted because of that. However, my plan is to increase the amount of work with Enterprise Agencies, or other organisations that offer training and mentoring support for small and micro businesses.

I admire people who can pivot like this and make brave and bold decisions – and I also admire people who plan first! Kathy did both of these things, and as you can see, it paid off for her. She has a great logo now, too!

Website: https://littlepiggy.ltd/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LittlePiggyUK/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/kathyennis

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kathyennis

Email: kathy@littlepiggy.ltd

Phone: 07815951585

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured (I have a full roster of interviewees now so am only taking on a very few new ones). If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on April 29, 2017 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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Small business chat update – Daniel Sodkiewicz

Small business chat update – Daniel Sodkiewicz

Welcome to an update with Dan Sodkiewicz from Royal Deer Design in New York and also now from GeekSeller. We first met Daniel in January 2015  and had an update chat in April 2016. Daniel formed his company a year before I set up Libro, it’s always interesting to me to see the different kinds of paths that businesses of the same age have taken. Back in April 2016, this was Dan’s plan for the year: “I would like to see 80% of our income source to be from our newly developed SAAS products (mainly GeekSeller.com), and 20% from web design business. That would be the ideal scenario for my business”. Did he achieve that? Read on to find out …

Hello again, Dan, and good to talk to you over the ocean. Are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

We are actually a way ahead of where I thought we would be. Our new company (GeekSeller) has grown much faster than I expected.

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

As planned, we closed our web design business and are now focusing on GeekSeller.com (an ecommerce multichannel platform). We do not do web design anymore, but are running our SAAS business, now with more than 15 people on the team and we’re still expanding.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

You shouldn’t hold off too long on hiring people. This is a common struggle for founders, who try to do everything themselves. Building a large, successful company can only be achieved as a team. I am very happy with where we are with GeekSeller, but I suspect we could have grown even faster if we had started hiring more aggressively early on.

Any more hints and tips for people?

Focus on your users. This was and is the main factor in GeekSeller’s success.

BONUS NEW QUESTION: What question would YOU like to ask other small business owners?

How do you deal with stress and overwork? Is there such a thing as work/life balance when you run a startup?

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

We would like to double our company’s size and have GeekSeller become the go-to company for ecommerce multichannel solutions, supporting all major platforms on the market.

I think Daniel’s point on hiring is very interesting – it’s a big leap to take, and not one I personally chose to do, but it’s very hard to get the timing right. I’ve seen people who’ve hired too soon and not had the work or finances to sustain it, and people who’ve hired later and wish they’d done it sooner. I’m not sure what the solution is! With regard to his question on work/life balance, the people I’ve seen who’ve achieved this are the ones who’ve planned back-up and holiday time from before they even started operating, and I feel this must be the key. I’m doing OK now, but it took a few years to even out and still gets tricky sometimes – I think that’s how it goes, though; it’s never going to be perfect and I still think you get more out of being self-employed or running your own business than you lose. Good luck to Daniel and GeekSeller for the next year – I’m sure all will go swimmingly!

Royal Deer Design, LLC
New York
Email
Web: www.royaldeerdesign.com  www.geekseller.com

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured. If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on April 22, 2017 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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Small business chat update – Matt Rose

Small business chat update – Matt Rose

Today I’m very happy to welcome Matt Rose of Prestige Quoting Limited. back to Libro Towers. I first interviewed Matt last year, when he’d just set up his business and, having done it very sensibly, was looking forward to growing the business and really pressing forward with it. When I asked him where he wanted to be in a year, he replied, “I’d really like to be in a position to consider taking on a 2nd person.” As predicted, he’s done really well, and he might even be looking at that goal – let’s ask him and see …

Hello again, Matt! So, are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

Broadly, yes, I am. Some things have gone better (revenue and world ranking, to name two) and some things I still need to address my mind to this year.

I’m certainly considering taking on my first employee, which is an exciting (daunting?!) step.

I’m currently reviewing the option of taking on an apprentice and looking at various council schemes that might make this decision an easier (financial) one.

In my first full year of trading I became the World’s Number 2 Solutions Partner. This means that I sold the 2nd greatest number of licences of QuoteWerks partners worldwide. This exceeded my expectations as I thought getting into the top 10 would be a great achievement.

I also won the individual award (QuoteWerks MVP).

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

The number of clients I have has significantly grown, both in the UK and the US. This has meant I’ve had to get clever at how I keep in touch with them to ensure that they’re still happy with the software. This has included regular mail outs with surveys and new feature details. I often use YouTube to link to videos of new features so they can see them in action, as opposed to just reading about them.

The growth of US-based clients has meant needing to work occasionally into the evening to virtually ‘meet’ with them during their office hours.

In terms of staying the same, the needs of businesses that could use my solution are still the same. What has always proved difficult, and still does, is making businesses aware that software like mine exists and being able to make them aware of why they need it.

With my software being bought in US Dollars, the exchange rate changes has increased the price of my software by about 20%, most of which I’ve had to pass on to clients. This has created one or two slightly uncomfortable phone calls with existing clients.

There are several services I’ve implemented such as using Moneypenny to answer calls when I’m unavailable. This was recommended to me by a client, as they use the service as well. For £30 a month, any calls I can’t take don’t go through to voicemail but they get to speak to a real person that will advise my status (I can put comments such as, out of the office today, will return their call when I’m available at 1600). This gives a much more professional view of the company and people often comment “I’ve left a message with your colleague”.

All my finance/tax/payslip tasks are also outsourced using March Mutual, another recommendation from a client. This means that at the end of the month, having logged all my invoices/expenses and when payments have been received, I get a payslip telling me how much money I can take out from the business and what needs to be set aside for things like Vat and Corporation Tax.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

Saying “no” is still something I’m quite bad at.

When I had a feeling that a client wasn’t right for the solution, or they wanted a scope to include X and Y for a price of A; there have been a couple of occasions where I, with hindsight, should have said no or stood my ground.

Any more hints and tips for people?

Outsource those jobs you don’t enjoy (or aren’t very good at!)

Services like Moneypenny, March Mutual and Fiverr are worth their weight in gold and free up time for me to spend on other areas of the business.

If you have a good client, and your solutions fit nicely, try and replicate that client. It might be a certain business type, for example. I would say about 60% of my clients are IT focused companies. Working with those businesses has increased my knowledge of that sector and I give a good impression to prospects in that sector, as I can ‘talk their language’.

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

I’d hope that employee number one would be on board and the business will have seen some growth, both in terms of clients and revenue.

He’s done so well, hasn’t he! I am particularly impressed at Matt’s organisation of his life and business; phone calls are very important to a business like his and it’s great that he’s found a seamless solution to that and his financial arrangements. Well done to him!

Matt Rose’s website is at www.prestigequoting.com and you can email him or phone him on 07490 096232

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured (I have a full roster of interviewees now so am only taking on a very few new ones). If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on April 8, 2017 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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What are the types of transcription?

What are the types of transcription?

There are many different types of transcription, and when you work as a transcriber, you might be asked to do any or all of them. Later in your transcription career, you may choose to specialise in one, and this can be useful for your career. It’s important to know about the kinds of transcription so that you can provide the best possible transcript for your client – if it’s important to them to include everything everyone says and you do an intelligent transcription, your transcription might not even be any use to them!

The different kinds of transcription

These are the main types of transcription. Be careful, however: some clients might describe these different types in different ways, using different language or explaining what they want rather than using a particular term.

Phonetic / linguistic transcription 

Phonetic or linguistic transcription is a highly specialised form of transcription which records not only the words used but the tone taken by the speakers and the exact overlap when two people speak. It is used when the client need to record what is said and how it’s said, because they need to analyse speech acts by a speaker or the exact nature of the interaction between two or more people.

I have encountered this kind of transcription being requested by linguists or clinical psychologists. In fact, I’ve also seen it in books and academic works about speech and interaction.

In phonetic transcription, you record the pronunciation of the words and the rise and fall of the sentence, overlapping utterances, etc., using specialised notation. Linguistic transcription does everything except the phonetic aspect.

For both kinds of highly specialised transcription (which is so highly specialised that I don’t offer it), you will be expected to use a range of symbols and probably a special template.

Time and pricing This is the most time-consuming type of transcription by far – expect to take twice as long as your normal speed, if not more. However, as a highly specialised type of work, the rate per audio minute is higher.

Video / descriptive transcription / captioning

If you’re doing video transcription of a film which is not simply of one or two people speaking, you may be asked to provide descriptive information or take down the text that appears on the screen. The purpose can be either to provide captions on the film in the same language, or to provide a script for translators to translate into another language.

This can involve two different aspects:

  1. Recording the wording in any information that appears on the screen: this could be marketing information, information about the speaker’s job and company, wording on diagrams, etc. This is usually requested when you’re producing text that will be translated.
  2. Recording the movements of people and other noises than speech, e.g. slamming doors, a car pulling up outside. This will usually be requested when your client is captioning the film.

Captioning itself is a specialised art and I refer any true captioning jobs over to a friend and colleague who is experienced with it.

Time and pricing: This again is specialised work and takes extra time to do; for example, the words on the screen might appear at the same time a voiceover is saying something else, so you might need to go over the same tape twice. Therefore there’s an argument that you can charge a little more. Captioning is a specialised art and commands higher rates, but you really need to know what you’re doing.

Verbatim transcription

When we do a verbatim transcription, we record every single the speakers say, but using standard typing and symbols.

This is used by, for example, legal clients, researchers and marketing companies and anyone who wants to get the full flavour of how the person was speaking. Many of my ghost-writing clients also want verbatim transcription so that they can catch the exact way the subject speaks and capture that to write their book to sound as if it’s written by the subject.

Time and pricing: I use standard pricing for these three kinds of transcription from here onwards, as they actually take around the same length of time to do: the time typing errs and ums and repetitions can be used up by thinking about how to rewrite someone’s words!

Edited transcription

An edited transcription is a slightly tidied up version of a verbatim transcription. It is usually requested by general interviewers and journalists, and also some academic researchers and writers. Ghost-writers might ask for a small amount of editing just to limit the number of ums they have to remove before they can write up their book.

So the editing can have various levels, but usually means removing ums, ers, and repetitions, as well as any “speech tics” such as repeatedly adding “you know” or “d’you know what I mean”.

You do the editing as you type, as it would be far too time-consuming to type out a verbatim transcription and then go back and edit it. Once you’re used to it, it’s quite quick and easy to do.

Intelligent / smoothed transcription

In this type of transcription, you will typically turn non-standard or non-native English into standard English. You are likely to be altering grammar and even wording, as well as doing the activities involved in an edited transcription.

I have two types of client who ask for this kind of transcription:

  1. Companies that produce conference or meeting reports – they want standard English throughout, and any speaker who is a non-native English speaker or even one that is a native English speaker but has a very idiosyncratic way of speaking will be smoothed out and standardised.
  2. Marketing companies that are doing research on a client’s product with its customers, for example. All they want is what the client thinks, straight and simple, to report back to their client, and may well ask me for an intelligent transcription.

Time and pricing: This is quite a specialised variety of transcription, as you need to be very confident in your own ability to write a good, grammatical sentence, to understand what someone has said and rephrase it. As a by-product of the kind of speaker whose words you are smoothing out, you need to be good at understanding non-native English accents. Not everyone is skilled at this, but if you are, it’s really fun to do, as it involves more thought than the other standard varieties of transcription. It does take a little longer than verbatim and edited transcription if the speaker is hard to understand, and I may charge a little more on that basis.

How do I find out what type of transcription my client wants?

If a client wants captioning or linguistic transcription, they will usually know this and provide templates and instructions: they will also check you know how to do this (don’t try to guess if you don’t have any training in this: it won’t work and it will end in tears!) and might give you a test.

To find out whether my client wants verbatim, edited or intelligent transcription, I include this question in my initial questions to the client:

“Do you want the transcription to have a complete record of all ums and ers / to be tidied up of ums and ers and repetitions / to be tidied into standard English and complete sentences where possible?”

This will usually get them to confirm what they want, even if they don’t use the specific terminology.


This article has explained what the types of transcription are and when they might be used, as well as examples of what they look like and some information on their particular challenges. You now know about linguistic transcription, film transcription and captioning, verbatim, edited and intelligent transcription.

If you’ve found this article useful, please do comment below – I always love to hear from my readers! There are sharing buttons there, too, so you can share this on whatever social media platforms you use. Thank you!

Other useful articles on this blog

How do you start a career in transcription? – are you suited for it?

The professional transcriber – the technology you need

10 top tips for transcribers – what every new transcriber needs to know

Why do you need human transcribers, anyway? – I explain why!

Keyboards, ergonomics and RSI – the risks and keeping safe

Transcribing multiple voices – hints to make it easier

Why do transcribers charge by the audio minute? – explains it all

How long does transcription take?

My book, Quick Guide to your Career in Transcription is available in print and online

 
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Posted by on March 22, 2017 in Business, Transcription, Word

 

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