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Monthly Archives: March 2019

What is the process once I’ve accepted your quotation?

We’ve looked in previous posts about the process of requesting a quotation from an editor in Working with an editor 1: requesting a quotation and going through the negotiation process in Working with an editor 2: negotiating and booking in. Now it’s time to look at the last part of the process – what happens once the job is confirmed and live.

All the details should have been covered off now …

  • We have agreed the price per 1,000 words or project price.
  • We have agreed the turnaround and/or deadline (if you don’t have the full project ready, I will give you a turnaround quotation, so I will complete the work within 14 days of receipt, etc. We have usually agreed a vague delivery date if not a fixed one by now.
  • If you wanted a sample edit done, I’ve done that and you’ve agreed that’s how you want to work.
  • You’ve read and accepted my terms and conditions.

What happens next?

1. You let me know about when you’ll have the full text ready for me and I’ll book you a slot. There are no obligations even then, although I do hope you will let me know if there’s any delay or you need to cancel. Lots of people have difficulty with their time scales, whether students, independent writers or journalists, so I understand and be flexible up to a point.

3. When it’s time, send me your manuscript and have a rest from it while I work on it (but be around in case I need to ask any questions).

4. I will do your edit and return the text and a style sheet detailing decisions I’ve made on anything that has different options (e.g. hyphenation, capitalisation, etc.) (see more on style sheets: What is a style sheet?)

5. You will confirm receipt and look through my changes, address those and any comments I’ve given. If you have questions or rewrites, I accept one batch of queries and 10% of the total word count in rewrites as part of the service with no additional charge.

6. I will send you my invoice and you will pay it within 30 days.

And that’s it! It all looks simple but I’m aware that if you’ve not used an editor before, this is an unknown process, and I hope I’ve made it easier for you.

Other useful articles on this website

Working with an editor 1: How do I request a quote?

Working with an editor 2: negotiating and booking in

Do I need editing or proofreading?

Working with Tracked Changes

What is a style sheet?

On completion of your edit, will my manuscript be ready for publication?

 
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Posted by on March 13, 2019 in Copyediting

 

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Words I have looked up – deuteragonist

Even editors (especially editors, who need to know what they don’t know more than most people) need to look things up sometimes. It could be a spelling you can never remember or the way a word is hyphenated in x style guide. Sometimes you just come across a word you don’t know at all, and this happened to me while working on a literary article.

So, what is a deuteragonist in a plot or play?

We know what a protagonist is – the main, central character. And an antagonist is the one who is against them. But the deuteragonist is the second most important person in a narrative – second to the protagonist. This could be the antagonist, but is more likely to be a secondary character, a sidekick, a faithful friend.

 
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Posted by on March 6, 2019 in Errors, Language use

 

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