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How do I know when Track Changes is turned on? Word 2007, 2010, 2013 and 2016

This article quickly explains how you know when track changes is turned on.

Do also read these articles to find out more about track changes: what Track Changes is, why we use it and where to find it, and how to customise Track Changes to suit our own preferences and learned how to work with a document that has Tracked Changes.

We turn on track changes to make sure that whoever else is using the document can see what changes (additions, deletions, moving text) we have made in the text. If you are working with an editor, they will typically turn track changes on so you can see what they have suggested. When my clients send me back amendments to a text they’re working on, I ask them to turn track changes on so I can see easily what they have done to the document.

How do I know when track changes is turned on in Word 2007 and Word 2010?

Word 2007 and Word 2010 look a bit different from later versions.

When track changes is turned on, you will see the button highlighted in orange:

This means that every change you make will be displayed in Word and other people will be able to see them if they have the correct view in their version of Word.

If the button is white, like the rest of the area, track changes it not turned on.

How do I know when track changes is turned on in Word 2013 and Word 2016?

Word 2013 and Word 2017 look different and the highlighting is more difficult to see, in my opinion.

When track changes is turned on, you will see the button highlighted in blue-grey:

This means that every change you make to the document will be displayed in Word and other people will be able to see them if they have the correct view in their version of Word.

When track changes is off, the button will be white, like the rest of the area.

If you want highlighting to be in a different colour, you will need to change the theme, and that’s for another article!


This article has taught you how to check whether you have track changes turned on in your Word document. See the links below for more track changes articles.

If you have found this article useful, please share or “like” it using the buttons below, or leave me a comment to tell me what you think. Thank you!

This is part of my series on how to avoid time-consuming “short cuts” and use Word in the right way to maximise your time and improve the look of your documents.

Please note, these hints work with versions of Microsoft Word currently in use – Word 2007, 2010, 2013 and 2016 all for PC. Mac compatible versions of Word should have similar options. Always save a copy of your document before manipulating it. I bear no responsibility for any pickles you might get yourself into!

Relevant articles on this website

Track changes 1 – why use it, where can you find it, what can you do with it?

Track changes 2 – customising Track Changes

Track changes 3 – working with a document with tracked changes

How do I accept one reviewer’s changes?

Why are my tracked changes changing colour?

 

 
 

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Small business chat update – Jane Badger

Small business chat update – Jane Badger

Hello this morning to Jane Badger from Jane Badger proofreading and editing (and she’s a writer, too!). Jane’s been with the interview series for a while now: we first chatted in November 2013 and updated for the first time in December 2014 when she’d gone full time with her editing work. After another update in January 2016 , we caught up most recently in February 2017, and at that point, this is where she wanted to be by now: “I’m hoping to have some local clients. The SfEP courses I did were really worthwhile, and my plan is to work on upgrading to advanced membership through doing more training courses, looking in particular at developing my editing skills. I will get the rights back to Heroines on Horseback, my book on pony books, later this year, so am investigating how I’m going to proceed with that. Whatever I do, it will be a steep learning curve, so I’m looking forward to that. The Society of Authors runs workshops on e-book publishing, so I’m planning on doing one of those.” Let’s see how she’s getting on …

Hello again, Jane! Are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

I do have some local clients, though there’s still more work to be done there.

I have done some of the training towards Professional membership of the SfEP (and passed the copy-editing exam, to my relief), but still need to do another course. I have an editing course run by the Publishing Training Centre in my sights. That is the one thing I need to do to upgrade as I have all the other requirements.

I was slightly side-tracked as I also did practical and theory exams in singing. They went well, thankfully, and I shan’t have to do any more music theory unless I find a sudden deep, burning desire to do so and can persuade my singing teacher that it will not be agony for us both. On balance, I think I’ll stick to the practical side.

I went to the Society of Authors workshop on e-book publishing, which was excellent – I can highly recommend. I also did one of their social media workshops, which was also very well worth doing, as it focused on doing things from an author’s point of view.

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

I have even more corporate work, which wasn’t quite the plan, but I’m going with it for the moment while I sort out the publishing side.

I’ve started up a local branch of the Society for Editors and Proofreaders, which has been really good. It’s got me out of the house, for one thing, I’ve met some lovely people, and have learned a lot about both proofreading and self-publishing.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

I’ve learned a lot on how to produce an e-book, and the differences between producing one that is fiction and one that is non-fiction (basically – pictures. The more pictures you have, the more Amazon charge you to upload, with a corresponding effect on your profit margin. I’m still experimenting with this). That and the cover are the last things I need to sort out with Heroines on Horseback, and then it’s off to beta readers with it to test out how it works on various devices.

I outsourced the design of my new pony book encyclopaedia website. I’m glad I did this, as design is not one of my strengths, but the project has not been problem-free. I’m still waiting for a major glitch to be worked out, as my plan was (and is) to launch the new website and the new version of Heroines on Horseback at the same time.

On the blogging front, I learned that a Buzzfeed-type blog post that I wrote in ten minutes managed 4,000 views in a couple of days. The carefully crafted post I did on railway women and horses, which took weeks to research, has 2,500 views. I guess I’ve learned that a balance of things is a good idea! And that all the years of research I’ve done into the horse does mean that I can pull something together very quickly. And that doing so does seem to produce something people want to read.

Any more hints and tips for people?

Don’t be afraid to try something new, having thought out the implications.

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

I hope I’ll have managed to get Heroines on Horseback back out into the world, and the new website, too! It’s frustrating to be so close but have to rely on other people to achieve what I want. But balanced against that is the fact that the end result will be much better than anything I could have done on my own.

I’m also hoping that I’ll have been able to focus on new writing. My plan for this year is to do less corporate and editing work for other people and carve out more time for me to write. It’s so very easy to do stuff for other people which pays within weeks rather than spend the time doing my own stuff, the payoff for which is months, if not years, down the line!

So, I’m hoping that I will have an income stream from my books, have a sensible plan to develop it further, and have acquired a couple more clients.

I love Jane’s sensible Top Tip – do it, but think about it first, in essence. And I can empathise with her blog post findings – one of my most popular posts is still the very first one I jotted down to remind myself how to sort something out! I did go back and add more text and screenshots, but it’s funny how something I did for myself ended up helping thousands of other people! I do hope that this time next year I can share links on where to buy the new Heroines on Horseback (it’s a great book – I have an original copy): good luck to Jane with that final push!.

Find Jane’s website at janebadger.com

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured (I have a full roster of interviewees now so am only taking on a very few new ones). If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on February 10, 2018 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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Hassock or cassock?

Hassock or cassock?

Inspired by a good friend sharing a photo of her husband and their son in matching church choir garb, in this article I’m covering a bit of an ecclesiastical theme. Now I’m wondering if everywhere around the world even has both of these things – maybe some non-UK people will let me know in the comments …

A cassock (a word which probably comes from Turkish, through Italian and French: thank you, Oxford Dictionaries) is a long article of clothing which is worn by some members of the Christian clergy and members of church choirs (not all wear them, but you’ll recognise it when you see it).

A hassock is a little cushion that you kneel on in church: you find them in the pews and choir stalls, often decorated in tapestry by church members. Interestingly, in America it also refers to a footstool – so does this indeed mean other countries don’t have the classic hassocks in their churches? The second meaning is a clump of grass or other plants found in marshy ground – I always thought that was a tussock and now I feel another Troublesome Pair coming on …

So, don’t get your hassocks and cassocks mixed up, or you might be insufficiently clad and kneeling on something far less comfortable than it should be.

You can find more troublesome pairs here, and here’s the index to them all!

 
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Posted by on February 8, 2018 in Errors, Language use, Troublesome pairs

 

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How do I move text using my Navigation pane in Word? How do I reorder the headings?

If you have set up Headings styles in your Word document, you can use the Navigation pane to move sections around the document without having to use cut-and-paste and endless scrolling. This article tells you how.

 

Note that this only works if you have applied headings styles to your document, i.e. marked your headings as Heading 1, Heading 2, etc. (see information on how to do this here).

How do I access the Navigation pane?

Please see this article with screen shots if you need help viewing the Navigation pane:

Press Control-F

or

View tab, tick the box next to Navigation Pane Show

How do I use the Navigation pane to move text?

You can use the Navigation pane to move all of the text under one heading. If you choose a heading with sub-headings, all of the text in the sub-headed sections will also move.

First, click on the heading for the text you want to move:

You can see that you will navigate to that heading in the document itself.

Then keep left mouse button clicked down and drag the heading up or down the list of headings (it will scroll automatically if you reach the top or bottom). A black line will appear at the insertion point:

When you’ve got the heading where you want it, let go of the mouse button to drop it into position. The whole of the text under that heading (including the text under any sub-headings) will have now moved:


This article has taught you how to move text under headings using the Navigation pane in Word. I hope you’ve found this article useful. Do please add a comment or use the sharing buttons below if you have found it useful or interesting. Thank you!

Other useful articles on this blog

Applying Heading Styles

How to Access the Navigation Pane

 
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Posted by on January 31, 2018 in Word, Writing

 

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Small business chat update – Nicky Lloyd Greame

Small business chat update – Nicky Lloyd Greame

Hello and welcome to Nicky Lloyd Greame from business coaches and mentors People and Potential, who we met first in July 2014. and caught up with in September 2015 and September 2016. When I asked her where she wanted to be in a year’s time, she said, “I would like to have a best-selling book, at least two online courses and to have been able to have helped many more clients – particularly children and teenagers – through workshops in schools.” How has she got on? Read on to find out!

Hello again, Nicky! Are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

Hello! In some ways yes very much so, and in other ways no – but the path to anywhere good rarely if ever goes according to plan and actually what I’ve learned on these ‘diversions’ has taught me valuable lessons I would have missed otherwise.

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

Business is still growing, both for corporate clients and individual clients, although this past year there seems to have been a surge in my individual clients. I’m still working in the Stress/Anxiety arena and there is an ever-increasing demand for this. I designed some children’s workshops which have now been successfully piloted – so now looking to roll them out to interested schools.  My book is still in the editing phase – and I must confess I’ve procrastinated on this one… largely because I keep changing the intended audience.

What have you learned? What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

That I love coaching very much but if I don’t have that mixture of coaching, training and creating then I lose momentum.  There were moments through this year where I felt a bit lost at sea … so through my own coaches and self-coaching I recognised I need the variety in what I do – and that contact with different people.  Working on your own a lot of the time can be very lonely sometimes and it’s important to recognise when this is happening and take action.

Any more hints and tips for people? 

Keep talking – to a trusted network of people – be it friends, coaches, family, clients… every conversation counts.

Keep moving – in business.  Businesses and the way they work are constantly changing … keep an eye on where you are moving towards and make sure every step – however small – is heading towards it – even if indirectly.

And … where do you see yourself and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

To be honest, similar to where I am now but with a more consistent client base. More training being delivered and more schools as clients.  I just want to help more people, especially children.

I don’t tend to get lonely in my work, although I do have a network of edibuddies and also get out and about running with friends a few times a week, go to my yoga classes, etc, but I can see that this can affect someone more used to dealing with people a whole lot more. So well done to Nicky for recognising this and working to combat it!

Nicky and People & Potential onlline at www.PeopleAndPotential.com and you can email Nicky, find her on LinkedIn, or call her on 01924 361738. Nicky also has a new website – www.thestressspecialist.com

 
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Posted by on January 27, 2018 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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Small business chat update – Julia Kossowska and Sam Lowe

Small business chat update – Julia Kossowska and Sam Lowe

Welcome to an update with my friends Julia Kossowska and Sam Lowe, who run Magical Maths Club Birmingham. I first interviewed them in the summer of 2015 and then updated in November 2016 – it’s my fault that I’ve got a bit out of sync with publishing these, they are very efficient and organised! When I asked Sam and Julia where they wanted to be in a year’s time, they said, “Growing steadily and also offering some options for schools to book us in directly.” It’s time to see how they’re getting on …

Hello again, Julia and Sam! Are you where you thought you’d be when you looked forward a year ago?

We are – more or less.  Just to recap – we are franchisees running Magical Maths Clubs in Birmingham. These are maths after-school clubs designed to give children very positive experiences of maths. They come to the clubs and the aim is that they will really enjoy the experience but also do some learning.

What has changed and what has stayed the same?

We certainly have a lot less change than some of the other people we have read about in this interview series.  Perhaps that is one of the advantages of being a franchisee.  A lot of work has gone on in the background to work out a system that works.

Michael Gerber has written a number of books about the importance of systemising your business and one that we studied quite carefully this year is The E-myth Revisited.  Although we already had good systems in place this book, which is an easy read, was useful in revisiting our thinking about the different roles that must be covered in any business, whether you are running a business on your own or have a whole team. If you haven’t read any books by Michael Gerber I do recommend this one.  Don’t be fooled by its simplicity.

As franchisees, we are allowed and indeed encouraged to spot small opportunities to make improvements, and some of the best meetings we have is when some of the franchisees get together with the franchisors and their team, and share examples of how systems, sales processes, relationships, clubs and games, have been made more effective.  Such incremental changes/marginal gains to how we work have made a huge difference to our overall effectiveness.

If you are interested in the importance of marginal gains to ultimate success you might want to take a look at this article and listen to this related interview – The 1% Factor Interview with Dave Brailsford GB Cycling Performance Director.

So what sort of improvements have we made?  Many but the ones that come to mind immediately are to do with how we communicate with our customers, e.g we know what we tell each person at which part of the customer journey, and improvements to the children’s activities so that each one feels exciting for a child of any age to take part in.  This might seem obvious but to find smaller elements that we might have otherwise missed we spent time picturing ourselves as our customers interacting with us and how it would feel for them. It was surprising how useful this exercise was and we will return to it.

What have you learned?

Obviously we learn from operating the business but because we are visiting schools regularly we have travel time that we can use as extra opportunities for learning from audio books and podcasts.  This is a great way to use what could be seen as disadvantage, as a positive.

We both enjoy reading.  Another of Julia’s favourite books this year, was Keith Ferrazzi’s Never Eat Alone: “When I picked up this book I thought it was be all about trying to have coffee or lunch with influential individuals so they would send business your way.  It is very much more than that.  It encourages you to build genuine relationships over a lifetime and also give careful consideration to how you can give back to your communities.”

We have chosen to work in a field which is all about service, and we have both volunteered in many different ways over the years, so in some ways we don’t need a book to tell of the satisfaction that this brings or the importance of making deep friendships which go back many years.  But this is an inspiring book and well-worth reading.

What do you wish you’d known a year ago?

There hasn’t been anything major that would have made a big difference.

Incremental learning, analysing what we are doing, making small changes and always looking for improvements seems to work well for us.

Any more hints and tips for people? 

Nothing that anyone would find surprising but as Keith Ferazzi says look for people to serve and look to work with people who like to serve.

Again, we can’t speak too highly of our staff, who often go beyond what is asked for.  When looking for new staff we have certain requirements but the most important of these is enthusiasm and a desire to serve.

And … where do you see yourselves and your business in a(nother) year’s time?

Our Franchisor has some great plans in place for developing our business – and we look forward to being able to share this when there is more news!

I really love the way that Julia and Sam are always looking to keep learning and finding new tips and techniques to refine their business model, along with using the support gained from operating within a franchise.

You can find the main Magical Maths Club Birmingham website here: https://magicalmathsclub.com/birmingham

And you can get in touch here if you fancy working for them. They are, of course, on Facebook and Twitter.

If you’ve enjoyed this interview, please see more small business chat, the index to all the interviewees, and information on how you can have your business featured (I have a full roster of interviewees now so am only taking on a very few new ones). If you’re considering setting up a new business or have recently done so, why not take a look at my books, all available now, in print and e-book formats, from a variety of sources. 

 
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Posted by on January 20, 2018 in Business, Small Business Chat

 

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How do I view my Navigation pane in Word? How do I see the headings in a list?

If you have set Headings Styles in your Word document, you can view the headings in your document using the Navigation pane. This article tells you how.

Why do I need to look at the Navigation pane?

If you have a long document with lots of headings, it’s really useful to get a view, a bit like a Contents page, showing all your headings and sub-headings.

The Navigation pane also gives you a handy way to move sections of your document around without too much copy-pasting and scrolling. Watch out for instructions on that, coming soon!

Note that this only works if you have applied headings styles to your document, i.e. marked your headings as Heading 1, Heading 2, etc. (see information on how to do this here). If you haven’t applied headings styles, Word can’t know what’s a heading and what’s normal text, so won’t be able to display your headings in the Navigation pane.

How do I access the Navigation pane?

Initially, your document will look like this: just the text on a page:

There are two ways to access the Navigation pane:

1. Press the Control and F keys at the same time.

2. Go to the View tab and tick the box next to Navigation Pane Show

In both cases, if you have headings set up in your document, you will now see the Navigation pane on the left-hand side of your screen:

You can see here that you have the top-level headings and sub-headings showing in your Navigation pane.

Make sure you are in headings view by checking the tabs at the top. You should be on the left-hand one:

How do I use the Navigation pane?

You can click on any heading in the Navigation pane to move directly to that heading in the document. For example, clicking on the “All about Twitter” heading in my Navigation pane will take me to that heading:

You can also use the Navigation pane to move chunks of text around, but I’ll talk about that in another article.

How do I close the Navigation pane?

You can close the Navigation pane using the x in the top right corner of the pane, or by unticking Navigation pane show.


This article has explained what the Navigation pane is, why you might find it useful and how to use it to view your document headings.

I hope you’ve found this article useful. Do please add a comment or use the sharing buttons below if you have found it useful or interesting. Thank you!

Other useful articles on this blog

Applying Heading Styles

 
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Posted by on January 17, 2018 in Word, Writing

 

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